Common Mistakes

COMMON MISTAKE MADE IN INTERVIEW

Just when you thought you nailed the interview and got the job… You get the dreaded news “Thanks for your interest…but no thanks”. Instead of beating yourself up by ‘shoulding’ all over yourself, stop and examine what you did. Explore what you will do next time:

Failing to prepare:

With all of the resources available today in the global library of sources, there is simply no excuse to go into an interview unprepared. Being prepared means knowing the company beyond the basics of where and when to show up. It is essential to research the company website and review it thoroughly. Bonus preparation includes knowing the marketing literature and investor relations information. Know its position in the market and what the primary concerns are for the future.

Failure to know you:

It is a sad truth that the best people do not always get the job. The real win in the interview process is in the ability to express what you do and how well you do it. An effective interviewee must articulate in a clear, concise, and natural fashion. The trick is to (1) first know what makes you special (2) communicate your contributions with specifics about what you have done to create success for your department/company.

Speaking without saying anything:

Always remember that your job is to answer the question. Take the time to listen and pause appropriately before speaking. Be expressive where you need to be and observe where the message needs to be ‘ less is more’. Better to say fewer strategically placed words than babble. Appreciate that the person interviewing you needs your help so keep it simple.

Being caught up in the past:

Create context that is relevant for today. Experiences that shaped you are important but you need to illustrate skills and traits through most recent roles, abilities, and experiences. Describe and detail days of present not too past.

Not listening:

Interviewers guide candidates and reveal what they want them to know. Pay attention! Being nervous can manifest in babble without listening. Pay attention to the words they say and notice what they don’t say. Ask for clarification when needed.

Too modest:

There is a time and a place for everything. Interviews are not the place to be humble and lackluster. Organization of thoughts through preparation will give you the confidence to share your story with ease. Facts allow you to toot your horn tastefully. As the saying goes “If you did it, it ain’t bragging”.

Checking out too early:

Comfortable dialogue is great but remember your purpose! Remember that you are a seller and only a potential buyer if there is a job offer. Be a promoter and offer, offer, offer! Salary, benefits, and vacation are buying questions that ask only what the employer can do for you.

Low-To-No energy:

Employers hire enthusiasm! Passion is the best promoter. Be passionate and express your tasks with purpose no matter how boring the duties may be. Never speak negatively about your former jobs or employers. Spin it positively.

Unrealistic expectations:

Be realistic about the job, the company, and what will make you happy. Know what lights you up and leverage what you have to offer without making demands. When you communicate what is important to you within reason, you need not make demands. No new opportunity can undo all the wrongs of jobs past.

Not asking for it with gusto:

Many people get killed at closing time by not asking for the job. Employers are equally impressed with how you close as how you begin. They want to make offers to people ready to accept. So, reinforce your interest, abilities, and willingness to do what it takes in an appropriate summary. Don’t choke when it counts.